Pearson
Always Learning

Posted by ChrisA | about 3 years ago

What is the sourcedid?

There are two types of sourcedIds used in the LearningStudio User Management SOAP services.

  1. Person SourcedId
  2. Group SourcedId

The sourcedId in the Person element is a unique identifier for the user. The actual sourcedId used by Learning Studio to identify the user is the concatenation of the Source and Id values.

    <person>
        <sourcedid>
            <source>gbtestc</source>
            <id>25237099</id>
        </sourcedid>
        <userid password="">student4</userid>
        <name>
            <n>
                <family>Four</family>
                <given>Student</given>
            </n>
        </name>
        <email>student4@test.com</email>
    </person>

The sourcedId in the Group element is used to identify the course or node that the user will be enrolled. Within that element the source is not used unless the grouptype is Enrollable Node(Source must be ECLG) but the id is used to identify the CallNumber or node.

 
    <group>
        <sourcedid>
            <source>gbtestc</source>
            <id>44-100-01-201420</id>
        </sourcedid>
        <grouptype>
            <typevalue>Call Number</typevalue>
        </grouptype>
    </group>

Why do we need sourcedids?

Before adding SourcedId for users, the only common user identifier between an institution's Student Information System(SIS) and LearningStudio was the username. This created a number of issues and made it difficult to modify a user's login credentials without manually manipulating the database. The sourcedId's were added as a better way for LearningStuido customers to map users between their SIS and online campus independently. This even allows for institutions to do bulk updates to user's LearningStudio login credentials while changing the SIS vendor or implementing a federated authentication solution. See the detailed instructions here.

How come I get an error?

There are several ways to end up with sourcedId errors but most can be avoided with proper planning. It's important to choose a naming convention that assures uniqueness and is able to handle changes in the future.

Source

The source needs to be unique across the entire LearningStudio platform. To avoid conflicts we generally recommend using the LearningStudio clientstring since this is also unique to your campus.

If you do decide to use different sources within the same campus make sure that user's will never have an account with more than one source.

ID

It is important to choose a unique and unchanging identifier to pass as the id. Most institutions use the unique identifier from the SIS.

Another important thing to remember is that if you use real users for any testing purposes you will need to make sure to use a different source than you intend to use for production. This is required even if you are testing on our integration test campus due to the requirement that sourcedids be unique across the entire LearningStudio platform.

Common Errors and how to fix them

Error Code Error Detail Resolution
-2147220717 An attempt was made to associate a login id with a sourced id, but it is already associated with a different sourced id. A login id can only be associated with one sourced id. Confirm the offending sourced id is valid and if so work with your SCO Representative to have the user(s) sourced id cleared in the Pearson backend.

The error above can be triggered due to any number of scenarios where the userid was submitted with a different sourcedid. It is best to verify that the submitted information is correct before requesting to remove the association to ensure the issue will not occur again. Once the previous sourcedid association has been removed, you may resubmitted the errored request to assign the new sourcedi. All subsequent requests for that user will require the same sourcedid

If you have any additional questions or issues with sourcedids, feel free to add a comment below or post them to the community and we'll be happy to help.

Blog Categories: 
Rating: 

Average: 3 (2 votes)

12912 reads
Always Learning
Pearson